@natgeo - National Geographic

Experience the world through the eyes of National Geographic photographers.
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Photo by @williamalbertallard // Montana, 2004

My English Springer Spaniel Buster scans the Montana fields as we look for grouse or pheasants. In the fall of 2004 Buster and I had driven from our home in Virginia to Montana where we stayed with some of my Hutterite friends at their colony near Stanford, Montana. Buster loved to hunt and it was so good to see him running through the tall reeds and grasses along the creek bottoms, snuffling and snorting, seeking the scent of pheasants that might eventually flush, giving him the chance to leap in a futile attempt to snatch their lengthy tail feathers. Even when he grew old Buster would still tremble at the thought of getting out to hunt. He lived to be thirteen and was a great example of the old saying that the only fault dogs have is that they don't live long enough. 
#followme @williamalbertallard for more images of Montana and other assignments spanning five decades.

#montana #hunting #dogs #gundog #springerspaniel
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Photo by @williamalbertallard // Montana, 2004 My English Springer Spaniel Buster scans the Montana fields as we look for grouse or pheasants. In the fall of 2004 Buster and I had driven from our home in Virginia to Montana where we stayed with some

Photo by @ladzinski / Hummingbirds flap their wings 70 times per second, which is 4200 times per minute. As you can imagine it takes an excessive amount of energy to do this which is why these tiny birds eat roughly 1.5 to 3 times their body weight in food per DAY! To put that into perspective, I weigh 165lbs which would mean I would be eating the equivalent of roughly 248 - 495 pounds of food per day to match this! This little #hummingbird here is a #versiColoredEmerald photographed near #iguazufalls #Argentina. To see more photos from this beautiful part of the world please visit @ladzinski
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Photo by @ladzinski / Hummingbirds flap their wings 70 times per second, which is 4200 times per minute. As you can imagine it takes an excessive amount of energy to do this which is why these tiny birds eat roughly 1.5 to 3 times their body weight i

There are some stories that defy telling. They are too complex, emotional, technical. They challenge our morality. They are unwieldy and deep. It is a unique breed of professional who can wrap their arms around such a story and tell it with intelligence and heart. This is both a thank you to @kurtmutchler, Senior Photo Editor for fighting for the tough frames and thank you my Photo Sister @maggie Steber, for sharing your relationship with the Stubblefield family. But also, a critical message to everyone who sees the story of Katie’s new Face—Please ACT— Sign your organ donor card, Listen to your loved ones who may have depression or trauma issues, Volunteer for the local Suicide Hotline, and finally—listen, truly listen to those living through the fragile times of life—our youth and our elders. Photo by @ljohnphoto
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There are some stories that defy telling. They are too complex, emotional, technical. They challenge our morality. They are unwieldy and deep. It is a unique breed of professional who can wrap their arms around such a story and tell it with intellige

Photo by @stephenwilkes.
A beautiful public park with great public art. 
Millenium Park, Chicago, Day to Night™ 2013
To see more photos from my travels near and far, visit me @stephenwilkes.
#StephenWilkes #DayToNight #MillenniumPark #Chicago #AnishKapoor #TheBean #fireworks
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Photo by @stephenwilkes. A beautiful public park with great public art. Millenium Park, Chicago, Day to Night™ 2013 To see more photos from my travels near and far, visit me @stephenwilkes. #stephenwilkes #daytonight #millenniumpark #chicago #anis

In Jan 2018 National Geographic Photographer @thomaspeschak reached and photographed Te Tara Koi Koia, an imposing pyramid shaped rocky island at the southern edge of New Zealand’s remote Chatham Islands. This is the only nesting site of the vulnerable Chatham albatross ( @chatham_taiko_trust ) and lies exposed to the wild moods of the tempestuous southern Ocean. Landing on and climbing Te Tara Koi Koia is only possible a handful of times per year and it took 27 days of waiting until a gap in the weather appeared. With the help of many Chatham Islanders @thomaspeschak was finally able to photograph this near mythical albatross nesting ground for ‘Lost at Sea’ a story published in the July 2018 issue of National Geographic Magazine. Thank you to the traditional owners for granting access and @ottowhitehead for shooting and editing the video.  The @chatham_taiko_trust is a pioneering grassroots conservation organization and this story would not have been possible without their support and guidance. Please follow @chatham_taiko_trust to find out more about this wild and iconic place at the edge of the world.
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In Jan 2018 National Geographic Photographer @thomaspeschak reached and photographed Te Tara Koi Koia, an imposing pyramid shaped rocky island at the southern edge of New Zealand’s remote Chatham Islands. This is the only nesting site of the vulner

Photo by @katieorlinsky // Captured #withGalaxy S9+, produced with @samsungmobileusa using Pro Mode ISO 50 at 1/1014th f 1.5 // Archeologist Laura Stelson @laura.stelson after attempting to summit Mount Mageik, a stratovolcano in Alaska’s Katmai National Park. This past June Laura led a National Geographic Society expedition through the backcountry of Katmai National Park along with a group of scientists, park rangers and photographers, including myself. We hiked along valleys, climbed up mountains, and waded through rivers for hundreds of miles, following in the footsteps of botanist Robert F. Griggs. Griggs led multiple National Geographic Society expeditions in the early twentieth century to explore the region and study the aftermath of the 1912 Katmai Volcanic eruption which decimated large swaths of land in the area, including what is now known as the Valley of Ten Thousand Smokes. The results and discoveries of the Griggs expedition played an important role in the early days of the United States’ conservation movement after his stories and photos published by National Geographic captivated the public. Griggs and leaders from the National Geographic Society even managed to convince then President Woodrow Wilson to create Katmai National Monument, 1,700 square miles of protected land. Today Katmai National Park consists of 6,395 square miles.
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Photo by @katieorlinsky // Captured #withgalaxy S9+, produced with @samsungmobileusa using Pro Mode ISO 50 at 1/1014th f 1.5 // Archeologist Laura Stelson @laura.stelson after attempting to summit Mount Mageik, a stratovolcano in Alaska’s Katmai Na

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Photo by @maggiesteber. Robb and Alesia Stubblefield hold their 21-year-old daughter Katie in January 2018, eight months and 23 days after Katie received a face transplant at the Cleveland Clinic in Cleveland, Ohio. Katie shot her face off in a suicide attempt in 2014 at age 18 due to a number of issues that caused her desperate attempt. After numerous surgeries and long hours of psychotherapy to prepare her for eligibility for a face transplant, Katie and her family awaited a miracle:  a donor face. One finally came and in May 2017 Katie received a new face in a 31-hour procedure. Throughout this process, her parents stood by her, learning everything they could about face transplants, medical procedures, medicines and numerous kinds of physical therapy. Their lives changed from being teachers to being ardent advocates for their child, accompanying her to daily visits with doctors and physical and speech therapists. They learned how to give her medications through a tube in leading to her stomach. In their most important role, they kept the spirits of Katie and themselves up through their faith in God and faith in Katie's team of surgeons.  They became warriors for their daughter in roles that continue even until today. You can read about Katie’s story in the September issue of @natgeo magazine…Story of a Face. Please share the story and the following hotlines and donor websites:  National Suicide Prevention Hotline: 800-273-8255. Register on this Organ Donor site:  https://on.natgeo.com/2MigvIB  Donors can save many lives as it did Katie’s.
@viiphotoagency @ljohnphoto #organdonor #suicidehotline #clevelandclinic
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Photo by @maggiesteber. Robb and Alesia Stubblefield hold their 21-year-old daughter Katie in January 2018, eight months and 23 days after Katie received a face transplant at the Cleveland Clinic in Cleveland, Ohio. Katie shot her face off in a suici

Photos by @CarltonWard | Cooperative Bear, Frustrating Panther…That was the title of the blog I wrote about my attempt to camera trap a Florida panther at Florida Panther National Wildlife Refuge in 2015. I was on assignment for @NatGeoTravel and after a month of trying, I had one bear kindly pose facing the camera and one panther show me her tail as she walked away. Frustrating and motivating at the same time, it was like she was daring me to try to tell her story. Three years and two National Geographic grants later, I'm still trying. I now have a network of camera traps (think photo studios hidden in the woods) pointed at game trails on refuges and ranches throughout South Florida for my #PathofthePanther project, which seeks to inspire the land protection needed for the endangered Florida panther to expand its range. I've had some successes with panthers over the past three years, but more often than not, my cooperative bear, frustrating panther mantra, still applies. Please follow my quest here and @CarltonWard as we focus on the story of the Florida panther and the habitat corridors it needs to recover and help us save wild Florida. The third photo is an alligator that should have been a warning that the water was about to rise. A wet winter, followed by strong summer rains proceeded to flood this trail for the next 18 months. @insidenatgeo @natgeocreative #FloridaWildlifeCorridor #FloridaWild #KeepFLWild #panther #bear #gator #alligator #swamp #Everglades
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Photos by @carltonward | Cooperative Bear, Frustrating Panther…That was the title of the blog I wrote about my attempt to camera trap a Florida panther at Florida Panther National Wildlife Refuge in 2015. I was on assignment for @natgeotravel and a

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Video by @bertiegregory | Antarctic fur seals whizz about in the turquoise glacial waters of South Georgia Island in the South Atlantic Ocean. After Captain Cook put South Georgia on the map in 1775, he sent word back to England of enormous numbers of seals. A brutal massacre then followed peaking in 1800 when 112,000 pelts were taken in just a single season. This harvest continued until the seals were hunted down to just 400 individuals. Since then, they've had protection and have bounced back to over 3 million! It's so awesome to see a conservation success story in a world where wildlife really needs our help. Shot as part of a new online series for National Geographic coming soon. Follow @bertiegregory for more wildlife adventures!
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Video by @bertiegregory | Antarctic fur seals whizz about in the turquoise glacial waters of South Georgia Island in the South Atlantic Ocean. After Captain Cook put South Georgia on the map in 1775, he sent word back to England of enormous numbers o

Photo and interview by @martinschoeller

Religion: Nuyagi Keetoowah Society
Ray Evans Harrell: I grew up in the O-Gah-Pah Nation in the current state of Oklahoma.  Indian religions were banned in 1883, so I grew up in the Indian Baptist community of Picher, Oklahoma, directed music in churches and ended up studying in New York.  In 1978 President Jimmy Carter signed the Freedom of Religion Act for American Indians and so for the first time we were able to come out, so to speak. We started having prayer circles on a roof down on White street in Manhattan.

I became the apprentice to a Cherokee Medicine Priest and am now the Priest for the Nuyagi Keetoowah Society. Our job is to uphold and bring back the knowledge of our culture. We obviously are not farmers and hunters, we are urban people, I am an opera singer, we're developing something in the present to live in this tradition.

Our worship is meant to acquaint you with how to sense the environment in non-visual ways because one is  really tied to whether something exists, by whether they can see it. Our religion is holistic in that it involves all seven senses. 
We meet at a Stomp ground and light three fires. We build a cornmeal circle and there are seven directions that we include because they represent the front, the back, the left, the right, the up, the down, the center. And then the eighth direction is to the universe. We call it a Medicine Wheel.

It symbolizes that individually we are inadequate, we are limited. But when we put the circle together we can conceive of the whole of the reality, discover a greater truth for ourselves. 
Our message is that you are responsible for yourself and nobody escapes responsibility for what they do. The world is your teacher and you are to understand that you are a part of the Creator. 
Everything is a part of everything.

For more of New York City's Believers check out @martinschoeller.
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Photo and interview by @martinschoeller Religion: Nuyagi Keetoowah Society Ray Evans Harrell: I grew up in the O-Gah-Pah Nation in the current state of Oklahoma. Indian religions were banned in 1883, so I grew up in the Indian Baptist community of

Photograph by @PaulNicklen // Travelling through the open ocean along the northern fjords of Norway, a humpback whale lunges to the surface, filling its mouth with herring. However, this mouthful of fish didn’t happen on pure luck. It was generated through a parasitic sequence of events between two species just before this photo was taken. A pod of orcas was first to the scene, herding schools of herring into a tight ball; a common and highly coordinated hunting technique. However, as the fish grew closer to the surface and the orcas began to feed, a pod of humpback whales rose from the depths of the ocean, mouths wide, bursting through the herring ball. As they broke the ocean’s surface, their mouths overflowed with an abundance of fish, made possible by the orcas. #FollowMe on @PaulNicklen to see when a large male orca swam within two feet of me.
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Photograph by @paulnicklen // Travelling through the open ocean along the northern fjords of Norway, a humpback whale lunges to the surface, filling its mouth with herring. However, this mouthful of fish didn’t happen on pure luck. It was generated

Photo by @gabrielegalimbertiphoto - From the project FIRST JOB - One’s first job is rarely forgotten. It is the beginning of adulthood, a rite of passage and a turning point. For numerous workers, only 30 years ago, the first job was often the only one, as people could remained in the same company for a lifetime, just being gradually promoted or slightly changing ones positions with seniority. In today’s scenario all is temporary, as the dream of a life position has forever vanished. Usually the first job is the first of a long list that will follow. In the wake of the worst economic crises in modern history, where for many young adults there seemed to be actually no possibility for a first job at all, I explore the world of employment of today’s youth. This is a project that will be carried out in all the 5 continents where the global theme does not obscure, but actually heightens the local specificities. Each one of the subjects whose portrait has been taken has an individual story that feeds into a larger narrative on how the world we live in is changing. From China to France, from Brazil to the U.S. we get a personal introduction to tomorrow’s workforce /// Shyamji Vishwakarma, 18 – Mumbai, India - Shyamji was born and raised in Faizabad, Uttar Pradesh. For 17 years he lived in the same house with his parents, 4 brothers, and 1 sister, but he moved to Mumbai a year ago. Now he lives with his cousin in Sangam Nagar, one of the city’s biggest slums. He’s a tool sharpener. He started this job, his first job, 7 months ago. His work basically consists of sharpening scissors and knives. He starts work every day at 10 a.m. and continues until 9 p.m., with a break of two hours for lunch. He has Fridays off. He gets paid on a per-day basis: 50% of whatever the shop earned that day. The daily average is between 0 and 450 rupees (7 USD). He says, “I want to learn this job in the best way possible and then I want to open my own shop.” #firstjob #job #india #mumbai #sangamnagar
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Photo by @gabrielegalimbertiphoto - From the project FIRST JOB - One’s first job is rarely forgotten. It is the beginning of adulthood, a rite of passage and a turning point. For numerous workers, only 30 years ago, the first job was often the only