@lgbt_history - lgbt_history

Have Pride In History® Matthew Riemer & Leighton Brown Authors of "We Are Everywhere,” @tenspeedpress contact@queerhistory.com
https://www.penguinrandomhouse.com/books/570409/we-are-everywhere-by-leighton-brown-and-matthew-riemer/
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NO MORE TRANSGENDER MURDERS! BRANDON TEENA (1972-1993) SHOULD HAVE BEEN HERE, Heritage of Pride, New York City, June 25, 1995. Photo © Mariette Pathy Allen (@mariettepathyallenofficial).
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This is one of the 300+ images we proudly feature in our book, “We Are Everywhere: Protest, Power, and Pride in the History of Queer Liberation,” available via the link in our bio. #lgbthistory #HavePrideInHistory #Night
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"NO MORE TRANSGENDER MURDERS! BRANDON TEENA (1972-1993) SHOULD HAVE BEEN HERE," Heritage of Pride, New York City, June 25, 1995. Photo © Mariette Pathy Allen (@mariettepathyallenofficial ). . This is one of the 300+ images we proudly feature in our bo

New York, New York
“STONEWALL WAS A RIOT . . .
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“A CALL FOR ACTION IN THE SPIRIT OF STONEWALL . . .
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“From Clinton’s betrayal of promises on gay rights to the refusal to take on the AIDS epidemic, to anti-gay ballot initiatives and outright ‘queer bashing’—we are under attack.
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“But we are also seeing a growing anger and willingness to fight back. Only by expressing this through collective resistance can we win our liberation—not through appeals to the institutions that oppress us.
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“‘Lesbian and Gay Pride Day 1994’ will mark the 25th anniversary of the Stonewall Rebellion. People from across the US and around the world will be coming to New York to take part in the march and other activities. This mobilization, like the March on Washington, shows our numbers, but focuses on the demands of a narrow segment of the lesbian and gay population.
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“The Stonewall rebellion was an action of the oppressed fighting back from below. Butch and Femme, transgendered people, street hustlers and drag queens—of all colors—fought back against the police raid on the Stonewall bar. The rebellion lasted several nights and changed the course of queer politics.
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“Many of the liberatory aims of the Stonewall rioters have yet to be realized. Join us in reclaiming the festive defiance of
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STONEWALL NOW!
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“10 PM · JUNE 25, 1994 · SHERIDAN SQUARE · NEW YORK CITY,” flyer, June 1994. #lgbthistory #HavePrideInHistory #Resist
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“STONEWALL WAS A RIOT . . . . “A CALL FOR ACTION IN THE SPIRIT OF STONEWALL . . . . “From Clinton’s betrayal of promises on gay rights to the refusal to take on the AIDS epidemic, to anti-gay ballot initiatives and outright ‘queer bashing’—we are und

Christopher Street–Sheridan Square
“ALL POWER TO BUTCH BULL-DYKES” — “SHE KISSED YOU ONCE ... WILL SHE KISS YOU AGAIN? BE CERTAIN WITH LESBIAN REVOLUTION,” Christopher Street Liberation Day, New York City, June 25, 1972. Photo by/copyright of Ellen Shumsky. #lgbthistory #HavePrideInHistory #Resist
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“ALL POWER TO BUTCH BULL-DYKES” — “SHE KISSED YOU ONCE ... WILL SHE KISS YOU AGAIN? BE CERTAIN WITH LESBIAN REVOLUTION,” Christopher Street Liberation Day, New York City, June 25, 1972. Photo by/copyright of Ellen Shumsky. #lgbthistory #haveprideinhi

New York, New York
WE ARE YOUR CHILDREN, Gay & Lesbian Freedom Day, San Francisco, June 25, 1978. Photo by William S. Tom, @onearchives.
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In 1977 and 1978, as Anita Bryant's Save Our Children campaign worked to repeal equal rights ordinances on the premise that children needed protection from queer people, activists across the U.S. answered: We are your children.
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We proudly feature this image, and discuss the roots and ongoing impact of “Save Our Children,” in our book, “We Are Everywhere: Protest, Power, and Pride in the History of Queer Liberation,” available via link in bio. #lgbthistory #HavePrideInHistory #WeAreEverywhere
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"WE ARE YOUR CHILDREN," Gay & Lesbian Freedom Day, San Francisco, June 25, 1978. Photo by William S. Tom, @onearchives. . In 1977 and 1978, as Anita Bryant's "Save Our Children" campaign worked to repeal equal rights ordinances on the premise that ch

San Francisco, California
“The most important fact is that gays have been here since day one. To say otherwise is a gross denial and stupidity. We played an enormous part in the history of America.” – Larry Kramer (b. June 25, 1935) (pictured July 1972). #lgbthistory #HavePrideInHistory #Resist
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“The most important fact is that gays have been here since day one. To say otherwise is a gross denial and stupidity. We played an enormous part in the history of America.” – Larry Kramer (b. June 25, 1935) (pictured July 1972). #lgbthistory #havepri

REPRESENTING THOSE WHO CANNOT MARCH OPENLY, Lesbian & Gay Pride Parade, Atlanta, Georgia, June 24, 1979. Photo c/o @ajcnews. #lgbthistory #HavePrideInHistory #Night
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"REPRESENTING THOSE WHO CANNOT MARCH OPENLY," Lesbian & Gay Pride Parade, Atlanta, Georgia, June 24, 1979. Photo c/o @ajcnews. #lgbthistory #haveprideinhistory #night

Atlanta, Georgia
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Heritage of Pride, New York City, June 24, 1990. Photographer unknown. #lgbthistory #HavePrideInHistory #Resist
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Heritage of Pride, New York City, June 24, 1990. Photographer unknown. #lgbthistory #haveprideinhistory #resist

New York, New York
“There is no pride in how LGBTQ immigrants are treated in this country and there can be no celebration with an administration that has the ability to keep us detained and in danger or release us to freedom.” – Jennicet Gutiérrez (@jenctegtz), June 2015
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On June 24, 2015, four years ago today, a number of the most prominent leaders of the LGBT rights movement gathered at the invitation of then-President Barack Obama for a White House Pride celebration. Just days before the Supreme Court announced its decision in Obergefell v. Hodges, striking bans on same-sex marriage, the White House ceremony was meant to be one of good cheer.
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Near the beginning of Obama’s remarks, as he mentioned the ongoing violence directed at trans women of color in the U.S., a shout cut through the crowd: “President Obama,” a woman yelled, “release all LGBTQ immigrants from detention and stop all deportations!”
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Jennicet Gutiérrez, an undocumented trans activist and founding member of @familiatqlm, hadn’t intended to speak up during the event; once there, however, she realized she had an opportunity to speak for those at greatest risk.
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It wasn’t the first time Obama faced interruptions over his immigration policies, but it was the first time he responded with pure dismissiveness.
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“You’re in my house. Shame on you,” he snapped, before asking security to remove Gutiérrez, who continued shouting as other activists booed her and chanted “OBAMA!”
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Obama’s argument seems to be that if you’re invited to a party, it’s only polite not to criticize the host,” @1demerith wrote days later. But when the host is in charge of a system that leads to members of a community he’s supposed to be celebrating being routinely abused and assaulted, and he has so far taken little action to address it, then breaking this rule is justified.
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Jennicet Gutiérrez spoke truth to power exactly thirty-two years after Sylvia Rivera famously confronted establishment gays at New York’s Pride festivities. Today, as trans women and queer immigrants remain the most marginalized in our community, maybe we can start listening to those brave enough to speak up. #Resist
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“There is no pride in how LGBTQ immigrants are treated in this country and there can be no celebration with an administration that has the ability to keep us detained and in danger or release us to freedom.” – Jennicet Gutiérrez (@jenctegtz ), June 20

The White House
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“LET YOURSELF BE ANGRY.” – Anonymous Queers, “I Hate Straights,” June 1990
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On June 24, 1990, 29 years ago today, during New York's Heritage of Pride, the Anonymous Queers collective distributed “Queers Read This,” a broadsheet that, as OutWeek described, “was not a particularly unusual Pride Day literature drop—except for the fact that the liberated tenor of the entire publication culminated in the final essay, whose title boldly declared, ‘I Hate Straights.’”
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Written by Avram Finkelstein and David Robinson, “I Hate Straights,” Nina Reyes summarized, “calls for lesbian and gay self-determination—regardless of how that makes our straight families and friends feel—and reminds us that even putatively gay-friendly straights still relentlessly shove the accoutrements of their heterosexuality in our faces. We have damaged our queer integrity by worrying that we may be flaunting it, when our fundamental concern should be whether or not we are free to be who we are.”
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For a community being decimated by AIDS and targeted by queer-bashers, the essay hit a raw nerve. “You don’t tell people who are being killed not to be mad about it,” said Maria Maggenti, articulating one side of the debate. The other side, activist Nick Mulcahy said, believed “hatred, however understandable, corrodes and, in large enough doses, kills.”
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“Such a well-written expression of just anger could do nothing but bring to light the most deep-seated homophobic and insecure responses,” two activists wrote. If straights declaring themselves pro-queer really are, “they will recognize in the instance of this essay that sometimes queers just need to have a sense of community, common experience and language without being apologetic and without having to give Homosexuality 101 lectures.” As for queer people attacking the essay, “by not owning their anger, by making nice to straights, they remain victims forever,” incapable of seeing the truths at the heart of “I Hate Straights”: “queers are immeasurably valuable, we have a right to feel angry and defend ourselves, the fact that we are alive at all in this straight-run world is a miracle, the fact that we fuck is a political act.” #Resist
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“LET YOURSELF BE ANGRY.” – Anonymous Queers, “I Hate Straights,” June 1990 . On June 24, 1990, 29 years ago today, during New York's Heritage of Pride, the Anonymous Queers collective distributed “Queers Read This,” a broadsheet that, as OutWeek de

“We were sick and tired of being criminalised, pathologised, demonised, of being made to hide who we were and having our rights to live as human beings denied.” – Mark Gillespie⠀
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Pictures (Sydney, Australia, June 24, 1978): (1) “GAY SOLIDARITY GROUP – REPEAL ALL ANTI-HOMOSEXUAL LAWS – END POLICE HARASSMENT,” Gay Solidarity Group. Photo c/o M. Gillespie; (2) Police arrest Mick Armstrong. @gettyimages.⠀
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On June 24, 1978, forty-one years ago today, Sydney’s Gay Solidarity Group “marched into the pages of Australian social history” by attempting to hold a parade followed by a celebration in Hyde Park.⠀
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The group assembled at Taylor Square, where, as Mark Gillespie recalled, “the early rainbow nature of the movement was evident, with transgender and Aboriginal people and people from migrant backgrounds all mixing in…The atmosphere was more one of celebration than protest.”⠀
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Despite having a permit to march, police harassed marchers and, when the group reached Hyde Park, police confiscated the flatbed truck that was to provide the event’s music and speaker platform. It became clear that it would be unsafe for the marchers to enter Hyde Park at all; breaking through a cordon of police across College Street, the crowd ran east down William Street, and hundreds of queer activists charged north at Darlinghurst, into the heart of King’s Cross.⠀
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“It was there in Darlinghurst Road,” Gillespie said, “that we faced the most brutal onslaught of the whole night. The police, arriving in numbers, took advantage of the semi-darkness of the night, unleashing a reckless and ugly attack,” and arresting fifty-three people.⠀
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The next morning, local papers published the names of those arrested, outing many and causing some to lose their jobs. This, Benedict Brook explains, “was the authorities’ attempt to keep the community in line. But Sydney’s gays and lesbians would not get back in line.”⠀
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Similar to Stonewall in the U.S. and Operation Soap in Canada, the 1978 Gay Solidarity March is credited with galvanizing Australia’s queer community into militant political action; the events are commemorated each year with Sydney’s Mardi Gras festivities. #HavePrideInHistory
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“We were sick and tired of being criminalised, pathologised, demonised, of being made to hide who we were and having our rights to live as human beings denied.” – Mark Gillespie⠀ .⠀ Pictures (Sydney, Australia, June 24, 1978): (1) “GAY SOLIDARITY GRO

Sydney, Australia
[CW]
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Photos: (1) The Up Stairs Lounge, New Orleans, c. 1973; (2) Up Stairs Lounge, June 24, 1973⠀
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On June 24, 1973, 46 years ago today, members of the New Orleans congregation of the Metropolitan Community Church (the L.A.-based gay church) gathered with others at the Up Stairs Lounge, a gay bar on the edge of the French Quarter.⠀
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The Up Stairs—an aptly-named 2nd-floor bar accessible only by a wooden staircase—was, according to one regular, a place to find friends if you were in need.”⠀
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In response to the ringing of a service buzzer downstairs, bartender Buddy Rasmussen asked Luther Boggs to answer the call. When he opened the door, a burst of fire knocked Boggs down and spread up the stairs into the main rooms. Some folks slid through the iron bars on the windows and jumped to the street; some followed Rasmussen to a hidden exit. Mitch Mitchell made it out before realizing his lover, Louis, was still inside; no one could stop him from running back in. Firefighters found their bodies together, Mitch’s arm draped over Louis.⠀
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The inferno lasted sixteen minutes, incinerating 32 people, including Jimmy and Eddie Warren, gay brothers out for a drink with their mom, Inez.⠀
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What little the press had to say about the fire was dismissive; no government officials said a word. Three of the victim’s families declined to claim the bodies.⠀
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The most likely suspect was Rodger Dale Ñunez, who’d been thrown out of the bar earlier in the evening. After his arrest, Ñunez escaped from custody; he killed himself in November 1974.⠀
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On Sunday, July 1, Rev. Troy Perry led a memorial service for 250 mourners, a huge crowd for a publicly queer event in New Orleans. As the service closed, Perry learned there were TV cameras set up outside.⠀
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“I cannot control what is happening across the street,” he announced. “I just want to tell you that you can go out of the side door.”⠀
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Decades later, Perry can’t get through the story without sobbing.⠀
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“In a city where people were really frightened, nobody left by the back door. People held themselves high; they walked out with their heads held high.”⠀
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Every single person walked out the front door. #lgbthistory
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[CW] .⠀ Photos: (1) The Up Stairs Lounge, New Orleans, c. 1973; (2) Up Stairs Lounge, June 24, 1973⠀ .⠀ On June 24, 1973, 46 years ago today, members of the New Orleans congregation of the Metropolitan Community Church (the L.A.-based gay church) gat

New Orleans, Louisiana
Marsha P. Johnson & Sylvia Rivera, Christopher Street Liberation Day, June 24, 1973. Photo by Leonard Fink, c/o @lgbtcenternyc.
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On June 24, 1973, during the fourth annual Christopher Street Liberation Day, tensions within New York’s queer community boiled over in a very public way. The commotion—which, Stephan L. Cohen summarizes, consisted of “Sylvia [Rivera] storming the stage to speak out for imprisoned transgender half-sisters, [Jean] O’Leary condemning men who impersonated women for entertainment and profit, and [Lee] Brewster castigating lesbians for their refusal to let drag queens be themselves”—demands more detail than afforded by an Instagram post. For now, we offer excerpts from Arthur Bell’s “Hostility Comes Out of the Closet,” written days after the event:
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“The whole thing with the bars & the baths & the women & the transvestites & the ideologies & the middle class is so fucking complex. There are really no heroes & just 1 or 2 villains. The liberals, the establishment, & the hardhat gays are into the status quo. The system is good now, they feel. Why bother with the crazies? Those who aren’t willing to compromise, who have visions of a new & better world, are the crazies. They are also the true liberationists.
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“When the gay lib movement sprung up, we were all crazies. As we became popular, & the middle class invaded, our ideology changed, & we acquired property for our functions. We needed money to pay for our property, so we went to the bars & baths to get cash. A little at first. Then a lot. Then we became dependent on property & the focus of the movement was the balance sheet. And the crazies dropped out. The Sylvias were summoned only when the spectacle of an angry fighter looked terrific on tv. And Sylvia would go to jail for us. But nix on the outrage at the social functions.
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“Rich old daddies don’t support transvestites. Nor do they will their money to liberation movements. So one has to go outside for support. . . . This year, [Pride cost] $4500. Last year, [it] cost pennies. . . . However, a lot of people saw a terrific show. My roommate said it was the best day of his life. Sylvia said it was the worst day of hers.” #Resist
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Marsha P. Johnson & Sylvia Rivera, Christopher Street Liberation Day, June 24, 1973. Photo by Leonard Fink, c/o @lgbtcenternyc. . On June 24, 1973, during the fourth annual Christopher Street Liberation Day, tensions within New York’s queer community